Transdisciplinary approach to measure conservation agriculture’s adaptation for climate change and food security in India

Food security has become increasingly important globally as well as on domestic fronts as global supply, income growth, and access is not keeping pace with increasing population in developing countries. Increasing resource degradation problems such as groundwater depletion, waterlogging, salinization, soil erosion, loss of biodiversity, and invasive species further add to food security challenges (Oliver and Gregory, 2014).

In the Indian context, the average farm size is very small and the average household member size is large, with poverty and food security prevalent among small land-holders (Pradhan et al., 2015). The issue is not only the availability of food but of its affordability by vulnerable populations in adequate quantity and quality. It is not a question of whether we can increase food production to meet the needs of the rising population, but whether we can do so in a sustainable manner. It is imperative to develop a long-term strategy that would reduce the vulnerability of the farming community and sustainably intensify agricultural productivity while minimizing the degradation of land and natural resources being used.